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Friday, September 15, 2006

The first person to post a comment...

...gets a mystery prize.

More stuff

I wonder if I'd write twice as much if I had two blogs instead of one?

Stuff

Sitting here thinking, God it's been ages since I wrote anything on my blog, but what the hell shall I write about?

Nothing ever happens to me. What about you?

Monday, September 04, 2006

Country towns and rural landscapes (Part III)

I'm rather out of date on my posts but hopefully in the next couple of days I'll catch up.

On the way home from Rye we stopped off at Sissinghurst, the Kent home of the Vita Sackville-West and her husband Sir Harold Nicolson. The gardens, which were designed by Vita, are amongst the most beautiful managed by the National Trust, although the celebrated White Garden is at its best earlier in the summer. It was nevertheless still very pleasant to spend the day there and take in both lunch and tea!

Sunday, September 03, 2006

Country towns and rural landscapes (Part II)


After Winchelsea, we drove on into Rye, which we had spent a night in a couple of years ago. We had chosen a B&B in the centre of the town, the Durrant House Hotel, which was very pleasant, peaceful and relaxing. Rye, too, is unspoilt and very rural in its atmosphere, many of its buildings constructed in the familiar red brick and tile facades of East Sussex. One of the oldest buildings in the town, the Old Grammar School, now houses a specialist LP dealer which boasts an extremely noisy device for cleaning up old second hand records!



We were surprised and a little disappointed that an artist from whom we had bought a couple of prints on our last visit (Stan Rosenthal), had moved to nearby Hastings. Much of the rest of the art in the town is by no means as original as his work, and I can heartily recommend his book to anyone who likes the type of modern representational art in which shape and colour are the primary drivers of the artist's inspiration. Talking of books, the town boasts several excellent second hand and antiquarian booksellers. I managed to pick up a couple of useful art history books - Linda Nochlin's Realism and an interesting reader on theories of modern art - at bargain prices.

On Sunday we took a drive out to Dungeness, a desolate tract of shingle and scrub in southern Kent which houses one of Britain's nuclear power stations. It is also home to a community of delightfully eccentric shack dwellers and a couple of light houses, one of which has some interesting former keeper's dwellings, although, as with all Britain's lighthouses, it is now automated and unmanned. Nowadays the peninsula is probably most famous for Derek Jarman's garden.